Easy Chocolate Chess Pie

My Family loves homemade desserts and I am up for the task as long as it is not too labor intensive. I had never made a chocolate chess pie before but remembered enjoying it a few years ago. Lucky me I had all the ingredients on hand and the pie making began, (and was all gone within 3 days!)

This pie is quick and easy and if you are chocolate lovers like my family then this is the dessert for you!

Filling Ingredients:

3/4 cup sugar

5 oz dark chocolate

2 tablespoons flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup milk

3 large eggs

1/3 cup butter

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 9″ pie crust

 

 Crust Ingredients:

2 cups ground oatmeal

1/4 cup sugar

5 tablespoons of softened butter

 

Instructions:

Place the oatmeal in a blender and chop until finely ground (you can also use nuts or cookies that have been crushed). Pour the oatmeal 1/4 cup of sugar in a 9″ pie pan and mix. Add the 5 tablespoons of butter and mix thoroughly, press mixture until flat and it covers the base and walls of the pie plate.

In a sauce pan over medium heat melt the butter and chocolate stirring constantly. When completely melted remove from heat and add the sugar, salt, and flour stir until well blended. Let this mixture rest about 5 minutes then add the vanilla, milk and heavy cream, stir vigorously for 2 minutes. beat the eggs and slowly add one at a time until completely incorporated into chocolate mixture. 

 

Pour the mixture into the pie crust and bake at 325 for 45-50 minutes. Let cool before serving. Top with homemade whipped cream and Enjoy!

 

 

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Holiday Cranberry Orange Bread

Cranberry-Orange--Bread

This Cranberry Orange Bread has been a gift to loved ones at the Christmas for as long as I can remember. I bake it in small loaf pans and deliver before Christmas to loved ones  along with other delectable treats. This bread gets some of the best reviews so I thought I would share it with you!

Ingredients:

flour eggs butter

2 cups of white sugar

1 3/4 cups of orange juice

2 eggs

1/2 cup of melted butter

5 cups of flour

1 tsp. baking soda

1 Tbsp. of baking powder

3-4 cups of cranberries

6 oz chopped white chocolate

1 orange sliced into quarters

Directions:

cran orange

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Place cranberries and orange in a food processor and chop until small chunks are reached.

In a bowl sift the dry ingredients, then add the cranberries and orange mix and blend well. Add the wet ingredients and bend again. Add the white chocolate chunks and mix one last time. Let the batter stand for 20 minutes before pouring into pans.

white chocolate chunks

Pour into 2 greased loaf pans or several small loaf pans and Bake for 35 -40 (larger pans) or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Let cool completely then drizzle or pour glaze over top of the bread.

cran orange bread

Glaze:

Place 1 cup of confectioners sugar, 2 Tbsp. orange juice and add milk until thin and soft liquid consistency is reached. Leave little white specs of sugar in the glaze to look like snow flakes when poured onto bread.

I hope you will find this is an easy way to show people you care at the Holidays.

This bread can be made ahead of time and frozen. Do not glaze until you are ready to give them away or enjoy yourself 🙂

Homemade Holiday Granola Gifts

pan granola

Homemade Granola

Makes about 2 pounds

Adapted from Feast, by Nigella Lawson

5 cups old-fashioned rolled oats

3 cups pecans, coarsely chopped

1 cup pine nuts or sunflower seeds

2 tsp. ground cinnamon

1 tsp. dried ground ginger

1 tsp. ground nutmeg

1 tsp. allspice

2 tsp. blackstrap molasses

1 tsp. salt

10 packets truvia

1 cup unsweetened granny smith applesauce (or another unsweetened fruit puree)

1 cup honey

2 tablespoons olive oil

6 oz. dark chocolate

Preheat the oven to 300F

 In a very large bowl, mix together the oats, nuts and seeds, truvia, spices and salt.

 In a small saucepan, warm the fruit puree with the molasses, honey, and oil.

Mix the warm liquid mixture into the dry ingredients until evenly coated.

Place on two baking sheets. (If you have ones with sides them, it makes it easier when stirring.) Bake the granola for about 45 minutes, stirring every ten minutes, until the granola is deep golden brown. Remove from oven, while granola is still warm from the oven add in the dark chocolate tossing until chocolate begins to melt and form clumps in the granola.

choco granola

 Cool completely. At this point you can add dried fruits if you like to add dimension, color and flavor to your granola. (white chocolate chunks and dried cranberries add for a festive holiday look.)

Place the granola into mason jars (the size is your choice), tie with a bow and give out as holiday gifts.

homemade granola jar

The granola will keep for about 4 to 6 weeks in an airtight container.

Thanksgiving Carrot Cake

Thanksgiving Carrot Cake

carrotsraisin

pecans

white choco chunks

In the fall my family longs for the taste of spiced goodies, this cake fits the bill. It is quick, easy and I feel good knowing that all the ingredients were placed in the mixing bowl out of pure love. I hope that you too will find that this recipe brings the taste of Fall to your family’s table and will remain a staple for years to come.

Carrot Cake

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups of sugar

1 cup olive oil

½ cup butter (room temperature)

4 eggs (well beaten)

3 tsp. blackstrap molasses

2 cups of unbleached flour

2 tsp. baking soda

2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. salt

3 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. nutmeg

1 tsp. allspice

1 tsp. ginger (ground)

1 cup chopped pecans

1 cup raisins (multi-colored)

4oz white chocolate chopped into chunks

3 cups grated carrots

Instructions:

Pre-heat oven 325 degrees

Mix sugar, eggs and molasses, add the oil and butter blend well. Combine the dry ingredients in another bowl and mix. Once blended add to the wet mixture and blend well. Add the carrots, raisins, pecans and white chocolate blend well until all is mixed thoroughly.

Place into 3 greased 9” cake pans for about 30 minutes.

Once baking is complete let cool and remove from pan.

Cream Cheese Frosting:

2 sticks of butter soften

2 packages of cream cheese

2 cups powdered sugar

1 tsp. lemon juice

1 Tbsp. heavy whipping cream (can use milk instead)

Blend the butter and cream cheese until well blended. Add the powdered sugar, lemon and heavy cream. Whip until light and fluffy.

Frost the layers of the cake, placing one on top of each other. Frost sides, and top. Store in the refrigerator to keep fresh.

carrot cake

Happy Fall & Enjoy!

Thoughts for Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day can be traced back to the Ancient Greeks and Romans who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele.

The ancient Greeks held an annual spring festival dedicated to honor the maternal goddesses Rhea. The wife of Cronus, Rhea was the mother of many deities of Greek mythology.

Ancient Romans also celebrated a spring festival, called Hilaria dedicated to the mother goddess Cybele. Ceremonies in honor of Cybele began some 250 years before Christ was born. The celebration was held on the Ides of March by making offerings in the temple of Cybele,  this festival lasted for about three days.

Mothering Sunday, from the UK is the most recent celebration, dating back to the 1600’s. This Christian festival was once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, it fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent, it was a time when people would return to their “mother church”. (Much like homecoming that is celebrated in churches today when people return to their home church for a special service and a meal afterwards).

Mothering Sunday eventually took a more secular route when children would present their mothers with gifts and flowers to show their appreciation. Mothering Sunday eventually faded out but regained new life when it merged into the American born Mother’s Day in the 30’s and 40’s. In World War II servicemen would purchase trinkets to send back home to their Mother’s or wives.

In 1872 Julia Ward Howe (writer of the Battle Hymn of the Republic) suggested in her “Mother’s Peace Day Proclamation” that Mother’s Peace Day be celebrated on the second Sunday in June. This was to be a day that Mother’s would stand united against war and be dedicated to peace.

Around the same time  Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia began holding meetings taught local women how to properly care for their children. These meetings became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” where mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

The efforts of Ann Reeves Jarvis’ daughter Anna Jarvis gave birth to the official Mother’s Day holiday in the 1900s. After her mother’s 1905 death, Anna Jarvis wanted to honor her mother’s good faith efforts as well as all good Mother’s sacrifices. She used financial backing from a Philadelphia store owner named John Wanamaker and proceeded to organize the first Mother’s Day celebration at a church in Grafton, West Virginia. Seeing the success of the first Mother’s Day celebration she set out on a long journey to make the celebration a National Holiday.

By 1912 many States and churches celebrated Mother’s Day. Jarvis finally succeeded in her quest when President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day  in 1914.

Anna Jarvis had envisioned Mother’s Day as a personal day for families where they could gather together and spend time making precious memories. It wasn’t long after Mother’s Day became a national holiday before florists, card companies and other merchants capitalized on its popularity. This infuriated Anna Jarvis, she spent all her personal assets fighting to have Mother’s Day removed as a National Holiday because it had turned into something entirely different from her vision. By the time of her death in 1948, Anna Jarvis was penniless and confined to a sanitarium.


From Goddesses to penniless, motherless widows, Mother’s day has seen great extremes. Mother’s have fought and struggled throughout the years to make this world a better place for their children to grow up in; they are ever persevering the face of adversity, sacrificing in times of want and above all loving in all circumstances.

Celebrate the Mother you love and those who have loved you this Mother’s Day.

Beautiful Mother's Day Box of Assorted Chocolates

Information for this article gathered from History.com and mothersdaycelebration.com and cocoamill.com

Easter and Chocolate

 

As children we hardly ever questioned why the Easter Bunny came to visit us and further more why did he bring us chocolate bunnies to eat? Why do we color eggs? What are the meanings of these traditions? While they are fun and make great memories with your family the answers may (or may not) surprise you.

easter greetings

 

There are no stories in the bible that refer to this fluffy hare bringing us baskets filled with goodies, no passages that talk about children painting Easter eggs to be hidden by a large rabbit. So where do these practices come from and how do they end up on our Easter tables?

According to the University of Florida’s Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, the origin of the celebration — and the origin of the Easter Bunny — can be traced back to 13th-century, pre-Christian Germany, when people worshiped several gods and goddesses. The Teutonic deity Eostra was the goddess of spring and fertility, and feasts were held in her honor on the Vernal Equinox. Her symbol was the rabbit because of the animal’s high reproduction rate.

The first recorded mention of and Easter Bunny was in Georg Franck von Frankenau’s De ovis paschalibus (About Easter Eggs) in 1682 referring to an Alsace tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter Eggs.

The idea of an egg-laying bunny came to the U.S. in the 1700s. German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area told their children about the “Osterhase” (sometimes spelled “Oschter Haws]). “Hase” means “hare”, not rabbit, and in Northwest European folklore the “Easter Bunny” indeed is a hare, not a rabbit. According to the legend, only good children received gifts of colored eggs in the nests that they made in their caps and bonnets before Easter. In 1835, Jakob Grimm wrote of long-standing similar myths in Germany itself. Grimm suggested that these derived from legends of the reconstructed continental Germanic goddess *Ostara.

Easter is a religious holiday, but some of its customs, such as Easter eggs, are likely linked to pagan traditions. The egg, an ancient symbol of new life, has been associated with pagan festivals celebrating spring. From a Christian perspective, Easter eggs are said to represent Jesus’ emergence from the tomb and resurrection. Decorating eggs for Easter is a tradition that dates back to at least the 13th century, according to some sources. One explanation for this custom is that eggs were formerly a forbidden food during the Lenten season, so people would paint and decorate them to mark the end of the period of penance and fasting, then eat them on Easter as a celebration.

Easter is a time for renewal and rebirth. The trees are growing buds, flowers are splashing the landscape with vibrant colors and the whole world feels like it’s waking up. As we enter into our Easter traditions this year our knowledge of this subject  will reign supreme.

As the cold and grey winter days,

Give way to the bright and beautiful spring,

You know it’s time for you to hear

the Easter bells ring!

The birds are chirping, the bunnies are out

There are Easter eggs all around!

There is happiness in the air

And a warmth in your heart

To stay with you, all through the year!

-Unknown

This information was obtained from the History.com, discovery.com and other sources.

Christmas in July: Granny’s Chocolate Fudge

Save this recipe for the Holidays.  It is super good.

My Husband’s Granny made this every Christmas without fail.  It was a treat that our whole family looked forward to. After tasting this heavenly creation I had to get the recipe from her.  I’ve made it several times and without fail it always turns out perfect. Unfortunately Granny left us in 2009.  She left behind a great legacy; from her beautiful family, to homemade recipes, to her sweet sayings we all have a little piece of Granny that lives on in each of us every day.

I hope you enjoy this sweet treat!

Granny’s Fudge:

1 1/2 cups sugar

2/3 cup evaporated milk

2 Tbsp. butter

1/4 tsp. salt

2 cups miniature marshmallows

12 oz Cocoa Mill’s Bittersweet Chocolate

1 tsp vanilla

In a saucepan melt the butter, add the evaporated milk, salt , and sugar, bring this mixture to full rolling boil.  Stir continuously for 5 minutes.  Remove the saucepan from heat and stir in the marshmallows, bittersweet chocolate, and vanilla. Continue stirring until the marshmallows are melted and all ingredients are well blended.

Line a 8 inch square pan with aluminum foil and refrigerate for 2 hours (or until firm).  Lift from the pan and remove the foil.  Cut into squares.  Makes 49 pieces (minus the piece you will eat while cutting it).

Tuck this recipe away and enjoy when the nights get longer, the days get colder and you are longing for a little piece of home.