Mother’s Day: Melt Her Heart Lava Cakes

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This Mother’s Day make your mom something special. It won’t take very long but it will melt her heart, just like when you used to give her homemade Mother’s Day gifts as a child. What Mother wouldn’t love and handmade gift from the heart? This recipe should be a winner.

Melt Her Heart Lava Cake

moltenlavacake-1

Ingredients:
Cooking spray, for spraying custard cups
1 stick butter
2 ounces bittersweet chocolate
2 ounces semisweet chocolate
1 1/4 cups powdered sugar
2 whole eggs
3 egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup all-purpose flour

flour eggs butter

Decoration:

Fresh Mint Leaves

Fresh Raspberries

Whipped Cream

raspberry mint

Directions
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Spray the four custard cups with baking spray and place on a baking sheet.

In a saucepan melt the butter. Whisk in the chocolate until it is also melted. Stir in the sugar until well blended. Whisk in the eggs and egg yolks, then add the vanilla. Stir in the flour.

Divide the mixture among the four custard cups.

Bake until the sides are firm and the centers are soft, about 13 minutes. Let stand 1 minute. Invert on individual plates while warm and serve with whipped cream raspberries and mint leaves. Enjoy with your Mom!

molten-lava-cakes

If you are not able to be with your for Mother’s Day click here (Cocoa Mill) for some fabulous handmade chocolate gifts to be sent right to her door that includes a handwritten note from your heart to hers.

Recipe courtesy of Ree Drummond

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Thoughts for Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day can be traced back to the Ancient Greeks and Romans who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele.

The ancient Greeks held an annual spring festival dedicated to honor the maternal goddesses Rhea. The wife of Cronus, Rhea was the mother of many deities of Greek mythology.

Ancient Romans also celebrated a spring festival, called Hilaria dedicated to the mother goddess Cybele. Ceremonies in honor of Cybele began some 250 years before Christ was born. The celebration was held on the Ides of March by making offerings in the temple of Cybele,  this festival lasted for about three days.

Mothering Sunday, from the UK is the most recent celebration, dating back to the 1600’s. This Christian festival was once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, it fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent, it was a time when people would return to their “mother church”. (Much like homecoming that is celebrated in churches today when people return to their home church for a special service and a meal afterwards).

Mothering Sunday eventually took a more secular route when children would present their mothers with gifts and flowers to show their appreciation. Mothering Sunday eventually faded out but regained new life when it merged into the American born Mother’s Day in the 30’s and 40’s. In World War II servicemen would purchase trinkets to send back home to their Mother’s or wives.

In 1872 Julia Ward Howe (writer of the Battle Hymn of the Republic) suggested in her “Mother’s Peace Day Proclamation” that Mother’s Peace Day be celebrated on the second Sunday in June. This was to be a day that Mother’s would stand united against war and be dedicated to peace.

Around the same time  Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia began holding meetings taught local women how to properly care for their children. These meetings became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” where mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

The efforts of Ann Reeves Jarvis’ daughter Anna Jarvis gave birth to the official Mother’s Day holiday in the 1900s. After her mother’s 1905 death, Anna Jarvis wanted to honor her mother’s good faith efforts as well as all good Mother’s sacrifices. She used financial backing from a Philadelphia store owner named John Wanamaker and proceeded to organize the first Mother’s Day celebration at a church in Grafton, West Virginia. Seeing the success of the first Mother’s Day celebration she set out on a long journey to make the celebration a National Holiday.

By 1912 many States and churches celebrated Mother’s Day. Jarvis finally succeeded in her quest when President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day  in 1914.

Anna Jarvis had envisioned Mother’s Day as a personal day for families where they could gather together and spend time making precious memories. It wasn’t long after Mother’s Day became a national holiday before florists, card companies and other merchants capitalized on its popularity. This infuriated Anna Jarvis, she spent all her personal assets fighting to have Mother’s Day removed as a National Holiday because it had turned into something entirely different from her vision. By the time of her death in 1948, Anna Jarvis was penniless and confined to a sanitarium.


From Goddesses to penniless, motherless widows, Mother’s day has seen great extremes. Mother’s have fought and struggled throughout the years to make this world a better place for their children to grow up in; they are ever persevering the face of adversity, sacrificing in times of want and above all loving in all circumstances.

Celebrate the Mother you love and those who have loved you this Mother’s Day.

Beautiful Mother's Day Box of Assorted Chocolates

Information for this article gathered from History.com and mothersdaycelebration.com and cocoamill.com

Women & Chocolate

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SALT LAKE CITY — A woman accused of attempting to steal items from the City Creek Harmons grocery store told police she ran out of money and needed Pepsi and chocolate to feed her addiction. (Story from KSL.com Utah)

The story above tells you how far women can and will go for chocolate.

Listen; Mother’s Day is coming up!  Let’s not make our Moms resort to petty crimes just to get what they really want and need.  Sure they may tell you “Oh honey I’m watching my weight.” or “I don’t need any chocolate.” but you know they really want it.

If you do get one of those lame excuses just know chocolate is good for people, and may help our dearest Mothers live healthier lives. The following research backs up this claim:

A study done in the fall by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology showed that a healthy chocolate habit, about two chocolate bars a week  appears to help women reduce their risk of stroke.  The study included more than 33,000 Swedish women who did not have any medical history of stroke, heart disease, cancer or diabetes and were between the ages of 49 and 83.  The ladies completed surveys on 350+ dietary and lifestyle indicators.  See Chocolate is good in more ways than yum.

Women love chocolate.  That is just the bottom line.  Happy Mother’s Day in chocolate, boom, best gift ever, given by you 🙂  Happy Mother’s Day… Enjoy some chocolates.